The best way to get a sense of the kind of material Boston Review is looking for is to read the magazine. We do not consider previously published material. Simultaneous submissions are fine; just let us know right away if you need to withdraw something.

We are currently closed to general poetry and fiction submissions.

We strongly encourage online submission. However, if you prefer postal mail, you can send (with a self-addressed, stamped envelope) to Boston Review, PO Box 425786, Cambridge, MA 02142. We do not accept emailed submissions. Payment varies.

We receive and read thousands of submissions each year, so the process can be lengthy, but we will get back to you. Please do not contact us about the status of submissions. If you need to withdraw a piece, please do so through Submittable. If you are withdrawing only one poem from a poetry submission, please do so by adding a note in Submittable to the submission.


Contests

Each year, Boston Review runs competitions in poetry and fiction.

We strongly encourage online submissions; however, contestants also may submit entries via postal mail but will not receive acknowledgement of successful submission. Email submissions are not accepted. All contest entry payments are non-refundable and previously published work may not be submitted to any contest. All winners are announced publicly and informed prior to that announcement. Please do not contact us to ask whether you have won a contest.

Contest entry forms will be available during the submissions periods. If a contest entry form is not visible, the contest is currently closed for submissions.

We also partner with the Unterberg Poetry Center/92nd Street Y to publish the winner of the annual “Discovery”/Boston Review poetry contest. Go here for more information on "Discovery"/92Y contest rules and submission periods. We do not host the submission process for the "Discovery" contest.

Ends on June 1, 2017$20.00
$20.00

Judge: Mónica de la Torre
First Prize: $1,500 and publication

Complete guidelines:
The winning poet will receive $1,500 and have his or her work published online by Boston Review. Submit up to five unpublished poems, no more than 10 pages total. Any poet writing in English is eligible, unless he or she is a current student, former student, relative, or close friend of the judge. Mailed manuscripts must be submitted in duplicate, with a cover note listing the author’s name, address, email, and phone number. No cover note is necessary for online submissions. Name and other identifying information must not appear anywhere in the submission itself. Simultaneous submissions (i.e., when the same poems are simultaneously submitted to other magazines) are not permitted, submissions will not be returned, and submissions may not be modified after entry. Failure to comply with any contest guidelines may result in your submission being disqualified. A non-refundable $20 entry fee, payable to Boston Review in the form of a check or money order or by credit card, must accompany all submissions. All submitters receive a complimentary copy of Boston Review's 2017 special literary supplement, Global Dystopias, edited by Junot Díaz. Mailed submissions must be postmarked no later than June 1, 2017.

The winner will be announced in the fall on the Boston Review website. All poems submitted to the contest will be considered for publication in Boston Review.

Online submissions are strongly preferred; however, submissions can also be mailed to:

Poetry Contest, Boston Review
PO Box 425786
Cambridge, MA 02142

Read winning poems from past years:
Cori A. Winrock (2016)
Safiya Sinclair (2015)
francine j. harris
 (2014)
Scott Coffel (2013)
Sarah Crossland
 (2012)
Heather Tone (2011)
Anthony Caleshu (2010)
John Gallaher (2009)
Sarah Arvio (2008)
Elizabeth Willis (2007)
Marc Gaba (2006)
Mike Perrow (2005)
Michael Tod Edgerton (2004)
Susan Wheeler (2003)
Max Winter (2002)
D. A. Powell (2001)
Christopher Edgar (2000)
Stephanie Strickland (1999)
Daniel Bosch (1998)


NOTE: This category should only be used for Global Dystopias fiction submissions. For nonfiction submissions, please use the Global Dystopias nonfiction category.

Special call from Boston Review fiction editor Junot Díaz:


Over the last decades dystopian narratives have proliferated to the point where they seem to have become our default mode for conceptualizing the future. But dystopias are not merely fantasies of a minatory future; they offer critically important reflection upon our present. If (as Tom Moylan has argued) traditional dystopias crafted cognitive maps of the terrors of the twentieth century, what cognitive maps does our current dystopian turn provide us of our turbulent global present?
 
Throughout 2017 BostonReview.net will feature stories, essays, and interviews on the theme of global dystopias. The project will culminate in a special print issue in the fall of 2017.
 
We are seeking essays, interviews, and fiction from writers around the globe that engage the theme of dystopia. Nonfiction, personal essay, genre fiction (SF, fantasy, horror, Afrofuturist, slipstream), and work that resides across/between genres are welcome.
 
Submissions might explore, but are not limited to:
  • Inequality / precarity
  • The Global South
  • Climate change
  • Global democracy
  • Civic media and civic imaginaries
  • Afrofuturism
  • The War on Terror
  • International politics and speculative futures
  • Post-humanisms
  • The future of females
  • Gendered violence
  • Radical futurities
The maximum length for submissions is 5,000 words.

Note: As a small and independent nonprofit, our resources are limited. The submission fee goes towards the editorial and production costs of publishing this issue. If the fee is a barrier to entry, you can email us with your submission at review@bostonreview.net. 
NOTE: This category should only be used for Global Dystopias nonfiction submissions. For nonfiction submissions, please use the Global Dystopias fiction category.

Special call from Boston Review fiction editor Junot Díaz:


Over the last decades dystopian narratives have proliferated to the point where they seem to have become our default mode for conceptualizing the future. But dystopias are not merely fantasies of a minatory future; they offer critically important reflection upon our present. If (as Tom Moylan has argued) traditional dystopias crafted cognitive maps of the terrors of the twentieth century, what cognitive maps does our current dystopian turn provide us of our turbulent global present?
 
Throughout 2017 BostonReview.net will feature stories, essays, and interviews on the theme of global dystopias. The project will culminate in a special print issue in the fall of 2017.
 
We are seeking essays, interviews, and fiction from writers around the globe that engage the theme of dystopia. Nonfiction, personal essay, genre fiction (SF, fantasy, horror, Afrofuturist, slipstream), and work that resides across/between genres are welcome.
 
Submissions might explore, but are not limited to:
  • Inequality / precarity
  • The Global South
  • Climate change
  • Global democracy
  • Civic media and civic imaginaries
  • Afrofuturism
  • The War on Terror
  • International politics and speculative futures
  • Post-humanisms
  • The future of females
  • Gendered violence
  • Radical futurities
The maximum length for submissions is 5,000 words.
You may submit query letters and unsolicited nonfiction up to 5,000 words.